Sat, Sep 23, 2017
image Welcome to Fun Time Tours & Safaris

Fun Time Tours & Safaris have a wide range of packages available for every different taste and adventure. For getaways with a difference we can offer you vast knowledge and experience in the industry.

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FLIGHT INFORMATION

From Eastgate (Hoedspruit) Airport - SA Airlink

Weekdays

2 Flights

From Johannesburg

Saturday

2 Flights

From Johannesburg

Sunday

2 Flight

From Johannesburg

Tuesday, Thursday & Sunday

1 Flight

From Cape Town

From Phalaborwa Airport - SA Airlink

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday

3 Flights

From Johannesburg

Friday

2 Flights

From Johannesburg

Saturday

1 Flight

From Johannesburg

Sunday

1 Flight

From Johannesburg

 From KMIA (Kruger Mpumalanga International Airport) - SA Airlink

Weekdays

6 Flights

From Johannesburg

Weekdays

1 Flights

From Cape Town

Weekdays

2 Flight

From Durban

Saturday

3Flight

From Johannesburg

Saturday

1 Flight

From Cape Town

Saturday

1 Flight

From Durban

Sunday

5 Flight

From Johannesburg

Sunday

1 Flight

From Cape Town

Sunday

1 Flight

From Durban


Spring and summer Average Temperatures 
(Many animals give birth at this time of year – visiting migrant bird species can also be seen.)
Spring (September - November)
Minimum: 20 Degrees Celsius
Maximum: 30 Degrees Celsius
Summer (December - February)
Minimum: 20 Degrees Celsius
Maximum: 35+ Degrees Celsius

Autumn and Winter  
(The bush is less dense and animals congregate more around waterholes.)
Autumn (March - May) 
Minimum: 20 Degrees Celsius
Maximum: 30 Degrees Celsius
Winter (June - August) 
Minimum: 10 Degrees Celsius
Maximum: 25 Degrees Celsius

Weather
Summers are extremely hot, peaking in January.
They can be very humid, often with little relief overnight. Heavy downpours and thunder showers are common, and do bring some relief from the heat for a day or two. The summer vegetation in the bush is dense, with an amazing variety of insects, birds, flowers and animals big and small. The migratory species are also best viewed at this time of year. Day and night, the air is filled with the intoxicating aura and excitement of the African bush where the shimmering heat of mid-afternoon, makes way for a cataphony of night sounds as soon as darkness falls.

Winters are mostly dry and mild to warm, with cold (June-July) nights, and fresh morning game drives. Little rain falls and the bush in generally more sparse, ensuring that game viewing in these months is better than in the lush summer months. For those who prefer less bugs to more bugs should consider a trip in these months as most of the small creepy crawlies hide away!
Click Here to view the weather.
http://www.accuweather.com/en/za/hoedspruit/1147501/weather-forecast/1147501

Clothing
The seasons in the Southern Hemisphere are directly opposite to those of the Northern Hemisphere. For summer months, lightweight (cottons and linens), short-sleeved clothes are best, although a light jersey / jumper might be needed for the cooler evenings. Umbrella’s and raincoats are essential for the summers, and the Western Cape winters. Warmer clothes are needed for the winter months.

Summer - One should expect rain storms or drizzle on any of these days. It hardly ever rains continually though and generally the rain storms last for only an hour or so. What to wear on safari? Cool, casual clothing is the order of the day. Try to keep the colours of your clothing as neutral as possible in order to blend in with the environment. Khaki colours and browns or greens are generally the best. Darker colours and colours that are very bright tend to attract unwanted insects such as mosquitoes and other bug type visitors. It may be chilly in the early morning so it is advisable to bring a light warm jacket. Shorts, sandals and swimwear for the pool are required. Sturdy closed-trainers or walking boots are a must for bush walks and long trousers are a better bet. Slip-slops or sandals to wear around the Lodge or to Meals. Do not forget sunglasses, hat and sun-block and often a lightweight cotton long-sleeved top should be considered for those with a more sensitive skin. Ponchos for rainy days in summer are provided for Game Drives.

Winter - Jackets, beanies and scarves will definitely make the morning and evening a more comfortable experience, even so, blankets are provided on game drive. A warm pair of gloves may also be an added advantage. You may also want to bring a warm track suite to wear instead of a dress or light trousers. Try to keep the colours of your clothing as neutral as possible in order to blend in with the environment. Khaki colours and browns or greens are generally the best. Darker colours and colours that are very bright tend to attract unwanted insects such as mosquitoes and other bug type visitors

Insects and Malaria 
Malaria is found only in the Lowveld of Mpumalanga and Limpopo and on the Maputaland coast of KwaZulu Natal. Malaria is not much of a risk in the winter months. Although the incidence of malaria is rare. it would be best to take adequate precautions if you choose to visit these areas. We do however stress that the Sabi Sands Game Reserve is a low risk malaria area and incidents of this ailment are very rare. The cheapest, safest and most effective measures against malaria are physical barriers, such as a mosquito net, and the use of a good insect repellent. If you decide to take malaria prophylaxis, it is essential that you take the drugs according to the directions on the package insert. You will need to start a week or two before entering a malaria-endemic area, and should continue taking the drugs for four weeks after leaving the malaria risk area. It is advisable to consult a medical professional before embarking on a course of malaria prophylaxis. Note that expectant mothers should avoid malaria medication.

Hospital and Medical Care 
Many foreigners are unaware that South Africa has a well developed infrastructure, high standard of water treatment and medical facilities equal to the best in the world.
In a great many medical disciplines, South Africa is a global leader. In fact South African trained doctors are sought after all over the world, so this should give an indication of the standard of medical care available. There is a large network of public and private hospitals countrywide, offering excellent service. However clients must have adequate health insurance to cover the fees private hospitals charge.

Local Medical Facilities 
Most Lodges has contact 24/7/365 with bush-trained medical personal telephonically and evaluation will be organized should the need arise. (Please Enquire) Otherwise Hoedspruit, the nearest town has medical facilities including a military hospital. Please pack your own personal medication required (prescription and otherwise).

Other Items on Safari 
Flashlight
Binoculars
Camera

If you wear prescriptions eye glasses or contact lenses it may be an idea to bring a spare pair in case yours get mislaid or broken. Also ensure that you have sufficient lens cleaning lotion as the outdoor environment may at times become extremely dusty which could require frequent cleaning
You should also bring a video or normal camera (with a good telephoto lens if you have one), a good pair of binoculars, enough memory cards for your camera (or film for those who still prefer to use film) and your plug and charger for the camera equipment.
All the rooms are supplied with basic amenities such as soap, shampoo and body lotions. You may however want to bring your own favourite items with you as well.
There are curio shops at most of the lodges. (enquire)
Most Lodges have a reasonably priced 24 hour laundry service available for guest. (enquire)

Tips
Please only tip is you feel the service warrants it and use your common sense, there is no expectation for exorbitant tipping anywhere in Africa. We recommend that you tip hotel or lodge staff at the end of your stay. When in doubt, please ask lodge managers for a tipping guideline. Professional Tour Guides, Transfer Guides, Game Rangers and Trackers we recommend tipping more suitably for their experience and knowledge. It is customary to tip 10% of the bill at all restaurants.

Electricity 
Works on a 220 volt alternating current system. Wall plug units take a round pin 15 Amp plug. It is advisable to bring the necessary converter or adapter from your country should you want to charge anything or use your own electrical appliances on our electrical supply systems anywhere in South Africa.

Safety Precautions  
African hospitality is legendary and travelers are warmly welcomed. However, as always when travelling, it is wise to take basic security precautions. Make sure you carry a record of your passport number, airline tickets, traveller's cheques and credit card numbers, and ensure that these items are kept in a safe place. Make use of hotel safe for expensive items and never leave baggage or personal items unattended in public.
South Africa boasts a vast array of cultures, communities, sites and attractions. Most parts of the country can be safely visited by tourists, provided they take basic common sense precautions, for example not walking alone in deserted areas at night and being circumspect about how much photographic equipment or flashy jewellery you carry. If in doubt, ask your hotel concierge about the safety of the locations you want to visit. Most major cities run organized crime prevention programs. Basic safety tip guidelines will be available at hotels and tourism information offices. If you are in doubt as to the safety of a particular area or attraction, contact the National Tourism Information and Safety line on +27 (0) 83-123-2345. The number may also be used for practical assistance in replacing lost documents or reporting incidents.

Travelling with Children  
Africa offers wonderful value for families, with many lodges and camps running specialised children's programmes. While South Africa is an ideal destination for children of all ages, the long distances travelled and frequent short flights in East Africa and Botswana are more suited to children eight years and older. For safety reasons, children five years and younger are generally not allowed on game drives. Please note that there may be different age limits for walking safaris and adventure activities. Our travel experts can advise you of these and recommend the best family travel options.

Cellular Phones  
It is not permissible to take them on safari as they are considered an intrusion during the safari. It is possible to buy cellular phone cards at most South African international airports for use in your personal cellular phones.

Banks and Money
As certain African currencies are difficult to exchange outside their country of origin, it is advisable to only change money as required. Most international airports have banks where money can be changed, and facilities are usually available at hotels and safari lodges. Most major credit cards are widely accepted, although not at remote bush lodges. ATMs are available across South Africa, as well as in large cities in other African countries. The currency unit is the Rand, denoted by the symbol R, with 100 cents making up R1 (one Rand).

photography  
Most Africans who have been regularly exposed to tourists do not mind being photographed, but it is always polite to ask for permission, particularly if you are taking a photo of a women. Some tribes in rural areas, particularly the Maasai, may resent being photographed without permission. Many African countries also have restrictions on where you can take photos, and it is safer not to take shots of airports, military installations, border posts, bridges and railways stations.

Film and Memory Cards 
Are generally available in bigger towns and cities, but it is important to check expiry dates and bear in mind that these may have been stored in areas with high heat and humidity. For best results, unless travelling in the main centres of South Africa, it is probably safer to bring your own supplies.

Beggars and Hawkers  
Poverty is a reality in parts of Africa and you should be prepared to encounter a number of beggars and hawkers. Please be careful when handing out any money or sweets to children on the street.

Time Differences  
South Africa operates two hours ahead of Greenwich Mean Time throughout the year making it an hour ahead of central European winter time, seven hours ahead of Eastern standard winter times and seven hours behind Australian central time.

Tax
Value added tax (VAT) is charged on most items. Foreign tourists to South Africa can have their 14% VAT refunded, provided that the value of the item purchased exceeds R250-00. VAT is refunded at the point of departure, provided receipts are produced.

Disabled Travellers  
Generally speaking, our facilities for disabled visitors can be improved, and this is an area our government is working on. An increasing number of accommodation establishments have wheelchair ramps and bathroom facilities for the disabled. Almost every national park has at least one accessible chalet and many accommodation establishments have one or two wheelchair friendly rooms. Most of our sports stadiums have accessible suites, stands or areas for wheelchairs near accessible parking, as well as special toilet facilities. Most public buildings also cater for wheelchair access.

Food and Water  
As a rule, tap water in South Africa is safe to drink, as it is treated and is free of harmful micro-organisms. In hotels, restaurants and night spots, the standards of hygiene and food preparation is top notch. It is safe to eat fresh fruit and salads and to put as much ice as you like in your drinks – a good thing too after a day on the beach or in the bush.

Road Safety 
Our transport infrastructure is excellent, and our roads are in good condition. However the distances between towns is significant, so if you are planning to self drive it is a good idea to plan your itinerary to ensure you don’t drive long distances, as fatigue is a major cause of road accidents. Avoid long car journeys that necessitate driving at night, as it always carries more risk. Also in some of the more remote rural areas, the roads are not fenced so there may be stray animals on the road, which could be very dangerous at night. We have very strict drinking and driving laws, with a maximum allowable alcohol blood content of 0.05%. Translated that means about one glass of wine for the average woman, and perhaps 1.5 or 2 for the average or larger man. Our speed limits are 120 kmph on the open road, 100 kmph on smaller roads and between 60 and 80 kmph in towns. Be aware that even major national roads cut through residential areas, so there may be a speed limit of 80 or 60 kmph on a road that looks like an autobahn. This is to protect pedestrians, especially children, so we really do encourage people to comply.

Driving  
All visitors intending to drive are required to obtain an international drivers permit. Visitors found driving without a permit will be fined and not permitted to continue on their journey. Visitors will also not be able to rent a car without a valid driver’s permit. The wearing of seatbelts is compulsory, and strictly enforced by law.

Vaccinations  
Visitors who are entering South Africa from a yellow fever zone must have a valid international yellow fever inoculation certificate. Only infants under the age of one year are exempt. Immunisation against cholera and small pox are not required, and no other vaccinations are required when visiting South Africa.

Shopping
Most major shopping centres and malls operate seven days a week, but you will find that in smaller towns and rural areas that shops are closed on Sundays.
Monday - Saturday: 09h00 - 17h00 Sundays: 09h00 - 14h00

Passports and Visa's  
For the majority of foreign nationals who travel to South Africa for vacation, entry is straightforward, and hassle free. All visitors to South Africa must be in possession of a valid passport, in order to enter the country, and in some cases, a visa.
To determine whether you require a visa to enter South Africa, visit the comprehensive South African Home Affairs Department website at:
http://home-affairs.pwv.gov.za
For South African missions abroad, visit
http://www.dfa.gov.za/foreign/sa_abroad/index.htm



AFRICA FACTS

South Africa
Capital city: Pretoria
Area: 1 219 912 km² / 471 011 square miles (five times larger than Great Britain and three times the size of Texas)
Population: 49.32 million
Time zone: GMT +2
Currency: South African Rand (ZAR)
Electricity: 230 - 240V
Geography: South Africa is flanked on the west by the Atlantic Ocean and on the east by the Indian Ocean, and boasts more than 2 500 km (1 500 miles) of coastline. The two oceans meet at Cape Agulhas, the southernmost tip of Africa. The terrain ranges from desert to green hills, mountain ranges, subtropical areas and sunny beaches.
Climate: Summer 18 - 29°C / 64 - 84°F; Winter 6 - 21° / 43 - 70°F
Language: South Africa has eleven official languages Afrikaans, English, isiNdebele, isiXhosa, isiZulu, Sepedi, Sesotho, Setswana, siSwati, Tshivenda and Xitsonga. Except for deeply rural areas, most South Africans speak English.
Religion: Predominantly Christian, but also includes Muslim and Hindu.

Botswana 
Capital city: Gaborone
Area: 582 000 km² / 225 000 square miles
Population: 1.6 million
Time zone: GMT +2
Currency: Pula (BWP)
Electricity: 220V
Geography: Botswana consists mainly of semi-desert, with the notable exception of the famed Okavango Delta.
Climate: Summer 19 - 33°C / 66 - 91°F; Winter 5 - 23°C / 41 - 73°F
Language: English and Setswana
Religion: Predominantly Christian

Namiba 
Capital city: Windhoek
Area: 825 418 km² / 318 695 square miles
Population: 1.7 millionTime zone: GMT +1 April - August; GMT +2 September - March
Currency: Namibian dollar (NAD)Electricity: 220V
Geography: From sandy dunes to rocky canyons, Namibia is home to two deserts - the Namib and the Kalahari.
Climate: Summer 19 - 28°C / 66 - 82°F; Winter 14 - 24° / 57 - 75°F
Language: English is the official language; Shona and Ndebele are the first languages of 98% of the population
Religion: Predominantly Christian

Zimbabwe 
Capital city: Harare
Area: 386 670 km² / 149 295 square miles
Population: 12.5 million
Time zone: GMT +2
Currency: The Zimbabwean dollar is the official currency (ZWD), although the US dollar is widely used in practice
Electricity: 220v
Geography: Landlocked country separated from Zambia by the Zambezi River, home to the famous Victoria Falls
Climate: Summer 16 - 27°C / 61 - 81°F; Winter 7 - 21°C / 45 - 70°F
Language: English is the official language; Shona and Ndebele are the first languages of 98% of the population
Religion: Predominantly Syncretic and Christian

Zambia 
Capital city: Lusaka
Area: 740 720 km² / 285 995 square miles
Population: 9.7 million
Time zone: GMT +2
Currency: Kwacha (ZMK)
Electricity: 220v
Geography: Deciduous savannas, grassy plains and even rain forest in the areas around Victoria Falls. Climate: Summer 25 - 35°C / 77 - 95°F; Winter 6 - 24°C / 43 - 75°F
Language: English is the official language
Religion: Predominantly Christian

Mozambique 
Capital city: Maputo
Area: 801 590 km² / 309 495 square miles
Population: 21.4 million
Time zone: GMT +2
Currency: Metical (MZN)
Electricity: 220 / 240 v
Geography: Wide coastal plains, mountains and plateaus with three major rivers and almost 2 500 km (1 500 miles) of coastline dotted with islands
Climate: Summer 21 - 29°C / 70 - 84°F; Winter 19 - 27°C / 66 - 81°F
Language: Portuguese is the official language
Religion: Predominantly traditional beliefs, followed by Christianity

Kenya
Capital city: Nairobi
Area: 582 650 km² / 224 960 square miles
Population: 30.8 million
Time zone: GMT +3
Currency: Kenyan shilling (KES)
Electricity: 240v
Geography: Low coastal plains and central highlands bisected by the Great Rift Valley 
Climate: Summer 16 – 33°C / 61 - 91°F; Winter 15 – 30°C / 59 - 86°F 
Language: Swahili is the official language, but English is widely spoken
Religion: Predominantly Christian, but also Muslim

Tanzania 
Capital city: Dodoma 
Area: 945 087 km² / 364 900 square miles
Population: 35.9 million
Time zone: GMT +3
Currency: Tanzanian shilling (TZS)
Electricity: 230v
Geography: Coastal plains rising to a central plateau and highlands in the north and south, including Mt Kilimanjaro, Africa’s highest mountain 
Climate: Winter 10 - 23°C 
Language: Swahili and English are official languages
Religion: Equally divided between Christian, Muslim and traditional beliefs